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Study Shows Human Activity is Accelerating Erosion of Coastal Cliffs

Uncategorized By May 06, 2023

Human activity is accelerating the erosion of coastal cliffs and threatening the habitats of wildlife and local communities, according to a report from the University of Plymouth. The study analysed 43 UK and Irish coastal locations and found human activity led to erosion rates that were as much as 10 times higher than in areas with no human activity. The researchers identified three ways in which coastal erosion was being exacerbated: development projects shifting the movement of water and sediment, recreational activities such as rock climbing and walking, and coastal defences that can increase the power of waves.

Study Shows Human Activity is Accelerating Erosion of Coastal Cliffs

Coastal cliffs are among the most iconic features of many coastlines. These natural wonders are not only vital habitats for wildlife, but they also protect coastal communities from the ravages of the sea. However, a recent study shows that human activity is accelerating the erosion of coastal cliffs, putting both wildlife and people at risk.

What the Study Found

The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Plymouth, found that human activity is causing coastal cliffs to erode more quickly than they would naturally. The researchers looked at 43 different coastal locations across the UK and Ireland and found that where there was human activity, erosion rates were up to 10 times higher than in areas where there was no human activity.

The study found that human activity was causing erosion in a number of different ways. For example:

  • Coastal development: Building structures such as homes, hotels, and seawalls can change the way water and sediment move along the coastline, leading to faster erosion.
  • Recreational activities: Activities such as rock climbing, walking, and beachcombing can damage the cliff face, making it more vulnerable to erosion.
  • Coastal defences: While seawalls and other defences can protect coastal communities from the sea, they can also intensify the impact of waves, leading to more erosion of the cliffs.

Why This Matters

Coastal cliffs are not only important for their ecological and aesthetic value, but they also provide vital protection for coastal towns and cities. As erosion rates increase, these communities become more vulnerable to the impacts of sea level rise and storm surges.

Furthermore, coastal erosion can also lead to the loss of valuable land and property. This can have significant economic impacts on communities that rely on tourism and other coastal industries.

What Can be Done?

The researchers behind the study suggest that better management of coastal areas is the key to reducing erosion rates. This could include:

  • Limiting coastal development in areas where erosion rates are high.
  • Restricting certain recreational activities that can contribute to erosion.
  • Using soft engineering techniques instead of hard coastal defences, which have been shown to be less damaging to coastal environments.

Hopefully, this study will encourage policymakers and coastal managers to take a more proactive approach to managing our coasts and protecting these vital natural resources for future generations.

FAQs

What are coastal cliffs?

Coastal cliffs are tall, steep rock formations that are found along coastlines. They are formed by the action of waves and erosion over thousands of years.

Why are coastal cliffs important?

Coastal cliffs are important for a number of reasons. They provide habitat for wildlife, protect coastal communities from the sea, and are aesthetically valuable

How is human activity contributing to erosion of coastal cliffs?

Human activity is contributing to erosion of coastal cliffs in a number of ways, including coastal development, recreational activities, and coastal defences.

What can be done to reduce erosion rates?

Better management of coastal areas is essential to reducing erosion rates. This could include limiting coastal development, restricting certain recreational activities, and using soft engineering techniques instead of hard coastal defences.

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